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One of the big differences between conservatives and liberals is that conservatives will freely admit that they have an ideology. I kind of feel like an old out of touch white man today doing this because of all the social media spin and name calling. The mainstream liberals dating back generations and up through the years of Barack Obama seem to recruit intellectuals and most journalists. These people do their very best to make people who disagree with them, out to be blinded or just plain stupid.

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Though Gov. Matt Bevin has refused to concede the gubernatorial general election to Democratic challenger Andy Beshear and has requested a recanvass, fellow Republicans U.S. Sen. Rand Paul and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell have faced the reality that the unpopular governor’s stint has most likely come to an end after one term. “Barring some drastic reversal on the recanvass, we’ll have a different governor in three weeks,” McConnell told reporters Monday, comparing the race and the slim margin of victory to his first election. “We had a recanvass, added them up, it didn’t change and we all moved on.”

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Nov. 11 is a date that needs to be marked on your calendar every year, if it isn’t already. It is the day that our nation pays tribute to the people who served this country with honor as members of the United States armed forces. Often times, as civilians, we may not appreciate the sacrifices these individuals have made.

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The recanvass of the Kentucky governor’s election won’t be done until Thursday, when we find out if Andy Beshear’s razor edge over Gov. Matt Bevin will hold. Nonetheless, I’m still pondering Beshear’s huge, historic margins in Kentucky’s largest cities. While I don’t think they mean much for next year’s election, when political behemoths Mitch McConnell and Donald Trump will be on the ballot, they do point to an intriguing blue path through Kentucky’s future political landscape.

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An internationally-known sculpture artist whose work has exhibited at The Smithsonian Institute and The Bronx Museum in New York City has been picked to design Lexington’s first-ever statue honoring women. The design of Barbara Grygutis of Tuscon, Arizona, was picked from four finalists out of 127 proposals submitted to Lexington’s Breaking the Bronze Ceiling effort. Grygutis’ proposed design include silhouettes of five women suffragists who pushed for the passage of the 19th Amendment, which gave women the right to vote.

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The third time appeared to be the charm for supporters of a “wet” McCreary County as a resolution calling for the legalization of alcohol sales passed Tuesday night by just under 300 votes. Unofficial vote totals posted by McCreary County Clerk Eric Haynes’ Office show 2,457 county voters supported legalizing sales, while 2,176 voted against. The “yes” voters carried 35.03 percent of total votes cast for a seven-percent margin of victory.

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The Letcher Grand Jury has named Eddie Ryan Profitt, Jr., 44, in an indictment charging him with murder in the shooting death of his brother. Kentucky State Police Post 13 in Hazard received a 9-1-1 call at 4:43 a.m. September 10 that a man had been found unresponsive in the basement of a house. When troopers arrived, they found Timothy S. Profitt, 42, dead of a single gunshot wound.

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A court order issued this week instructs Gov. Matt Bevin’s administration to publicly release documents that show the names of investors in Braidy Industries, but the legal battle isn't over. Franklin Circuit Judge Phillip Shepherd issued a decision Tuesday ordering the Kentucky Cabinet for Economic Development to release to The Courier Journal four documents that name certain investors in Braidy, including a stock purchase agreement and investor's rights agreement.

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Louisville's new women’s soccer team has a name that should resonate with potential sponsors in the bourbon business: Proof Louisville FC. The National Women’s Soccer League filed a trademark application last week with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office seeking exclusive rights to use Proof Louisville FC on drinkware, clothing, keychains, backpacks, lip balm and other merchandise. Louisville City FC President Brad Estes confirmed Tuesday that Proof Louisville FC had been chosen for the new team out of “probably 100 names.” "I think it's neat, pun intended," said Karl Schmitt, president and CEO of the Louisville Sports Commission. "Three fingers neat."

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Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin told a crowd of young conservatives that he is not conceding last week's election to Democratic challenger Andy Beshear because people are trying "to hijack our political process." "I would rather lose a clean election than win a dirty election. And I'll be darned if I want to lose a dirty election," he said to applause at a Young America's Foundation event Saturday in California. "So to that end, let's just make sure it's legit, and so that's what we are in the process of doing." Bevin trails Democrat Andy Beshear by more than 5,000 votes in the unofficial election results and has asked for a recanvass, which will begin at 9 a.m. Thursday.

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Franklin Circuit Court Judge Phillip Shepherd has once again told the Bevin Administration that it must release the names of investors in the partially state-owned Braidy Industries, which plans to build an aluminum mill in northeastern Kentucky. Shepherd, in a 13-page order released Tuesday, said he had reviewed a Kentucky Court of Appeals ruling last May 17 that upheld part of his 2018 ruling that the state Cabinet for Economic and Development Cabinet had violated the state’s Open Records Act by refusing to release documents to The Courier Journal that reveal the identity of stockholders or investors in Braidy Industries. The appellate court had reversed the part of Shepherd’s decision that said certain other information in the state’s records about Braidy must also be released.

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A Kentucky lawmaker shared a hoax on Facebook Tuesday, passing on a chain message that falsely claims terrorists are knocking on doors to inject people with HIV. State Rep. George Brown, D-Lexington, shared the chain message, which started by listing a phone number with a Maryland area code. When dialed, a recording said the number could not accept calls.

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On Thursday morning, every county board of election in Kentucky will meet to recanvass the results of the Nov. 5 election for governor. The recanvass comes at the request of Gov. Matt Bevin, who lost last Tuesday by 0.38 percentage points to Gov.-elect Andy Beshear. A recanvass is relatively common in close races, but Kentucky hasn’t seen one in a statewide race since the last time Bevin was running for office, when he beat U.S. Rep. James Comer by 83 points in the Republican Primary in 2015.

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A man listed as one of Fayette County’s “most wanted” was apprehended Nov. 6 by the Lawrenceburg Police Department after he allegedly strangled a woman and “threw her around like a rag doll,” according to an arrest warrant. Charles Deshaun Murphy, who is listed on several police citations as homeless, was taken into custody by Sgt. Brian Brashears around 11:30 p.m. at 1141 Versailles Road. He was wanted on a host of outstanding arrest warrants from Anderson, Fayette and Madison counties at the time of his arrest, police records show.

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The Kentucky State Police are asking for the public's help in finding an escaped inmate from the Webster County jail. The escapee is William D. Casto, age 29, of Corydon, Ky. Casto is a white male, with brown hair, blue eyes, approximately 5’6” tall, and weighs approximately 155 pounds. Casto was last seen wearing blue jeans with khaki pants underneath, and an orange t-shirt with Webster County Jail Trustee on the back.

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An Illinois man accused of murdering a man at a Labor Day outing in a Frankfort park has been indicted by a Franklin County Circuit Court grand jury. Justin Cromer, 28, is charged with capital murder, a Class A felony. On the indictment, Cromer’s address is listed as East Saint Louis, Illinois. Cromer was arrested in Detroit on Oct. 23 by the U.S. Marshals Service. He was extradited to Franklin County and booked in the Franklin County Regional Jail on Nov. 4. He is being held on a $1 million bond, according to the jail website.

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MeetNKY's finance director pleaded guilty to embezzlement of more than $4 million in a case that stemmed from an online dating service, according to prosecutors. Bridget Ann Johnson, 59, of Cincinnati, was found guilty of complicity to theft, abuse of public trust and unlawful access to a computer.

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One week after Kentucky's gubernatorial election ended in an apparent narrow defeat for incumbent Republican Gov. Matt Bevin, a panel of political science professors gathered at Western Kentucky University on Tuesday to dissect the results. Asked by a moderator why support from President Donald Trump wasn’t enough to win Bevin a second term, Political Science Department head Scott Lasley was ready with a quick retort. “Because he’s Matt Bevin,” Lasley said, speaking at the event in WKU’s Downing Student Union.

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Many of the men of Charlie Battery who still live in or near Bardstown sometimes get together over coffee or for car shows and veterans events, but for others the reunion Saturday at the National Guard Armory was the first time in a long time to get reacquainted with old friends and fellow warriors. Last month marked the 50th anniversary of the return home of veterans of the Kentucky Army National Guard’s C-Battery, 2nd Battalion, 138th Field Artillery, after their tour of duty in Vietnam from 1968 to 1969. Many served together at two fire bases, including Fire Base Tomahawk, where six of the members died in battle when the North Vietnamese Army attacked on June 19, 1969.

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Dave Jarrett, an Elizabethtown U.S. Navy retiree known for his countless hours devoted as a service officer helping fellow veterans access their benefits, has provided another unique piece of help. This time he’s a hero to historians. Jarrett recently donated a cherish family letter to the United States Holo­caust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C.

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Monday, we celebrated Veterans Day. Many people found many ways to say “thank you” to the people who have served in the U.S. military. But there were 541 service members who never heard those thank-yous — they are the 541 service members who died from suicide in 2018. Everyone who is serious about thanking veterans for their service should lend their voices to the effort to fix the military suicide rate.

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The 2019 gubernatorial election is over, but the saga may just be beginning. In a race that was marked by extreme partisanship and vitriol by candidates and supporters alike, we shouldn’t be surprised that the conclusion won’t come easy.

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State Rep. Charles Booker, D-Louisville, has formed an exploratory committee to run for U.S. Senate in 2020, potentially creating a crowded Democratic primary for the opportunity to take on U.S. Sen. Majority Leader Mitch McConnell next November. Booker’s campaign would be a long shot. He was elected to the Kentucky House of Representatives in 2018 and quickly became one of the more vocal members of the minority party.

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A University of Kentucky basketball devotee who lives in North Carolina had a once-in-a-lifetime find last month, and he followed it with a grand gesture. Jimmy Mahan, who attended Henry Clay High School and UK in Lexington, is a basketball card collector with the appropriate Twitter name of @KentuckyCards. He knew the significance last month when he found a card featuring two former Duke stars, R.J. Barrett and Zion Williamson. This rookie card featured the autographs of both players, and was 1/1 — meaning it was the only one that exists. Opening a box of Panini Prizm Draft Picks basketball trading cards live on YouTube, his expression immediately shifted when he saw the autographed card. He told ABC 11 he felt like he was 8-years-old on Christmas morning.

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The attorney for Rene Boucher has requested the U.S. Supreme Court review a lower court’s ruling reversing the 30-day prison sentence Boucher was ordered to serve after pleading guilty to assaulting his neighbor, U.S. Sen. Rand Paul. Attorney Matt Baker on Friday filed with the Supreme Court a petition for a writ of certiorari, a legal term used to define a formal request for the high court to order a lower court to send a case up for review. Boucher, 61, was ordered in U.S. District Court to serve 30 days in prison, pay a $10,000 fine and perform 100 hours of community service after pleading guilty to assaulting a member of Congress.

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Police say there is no apparent reason behind an incident that left one man with multiple stab wounds and a woman in jail this weekend. Michelle Hunter, 40, was arrested for first-degree assault Sunday morning after she allegedly stabbed a fellow resident at the Beacon of Hope Emergency Shelter. Winchester Police Capt. James Hall said the victim’s injuries were not believed to be life-threatening, but he was transported directly to the University of Kentucky Medical Center.

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He cranes his neck and points to the top branches of a tall 35-foot Tulip Poplar. It's there that WLKY meteorologist John Belski has spied a sign of a rough winter ahead. "The higher the squirrel nest the colder the winter is supposed to be and look how close it is to the top," Belski points out. "The squirrels are building at record heights. This tree has never had a nest at the absolute top before. The highest I've seen in previous years has been about 10 feet below that spot." That just may mean we're in for a cold winter. And if this weekend's weather prediction of temperatures dipping into the 20s has anything to do with it, that might just be right.

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In case you missed it: Snow flakes fell Monday night, and it was brutally cold Tuesday morning. And while it appears snow won't be back for the near future, don't break out the short-sleeve shirts just yet. The low temperature for Tuesday night at Louisville Muhammad Ali International Airport is forecast to be 18 degrees, according to Louisville National Weather Service meteorologist Mark Jarvis. That will approach a 33-year-old record — the lowest temperature on Nov. 12 ever was 16 degrees in 1986.

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The Roman Catholic Diocese of Lexington has agreed to lease a little-used retreat center on Herrington Lake to community groups for a new alcohol and drug treatment center, the diocese announced Friday. Cliffview Retreat and Conference Center, located on an isolated peninsula on 42 acres between Herrington Lake and the Dix River, will be leased to the Catholic Action Center, a homeless service provider in Lexington, with an option to buy.

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Much of Central and Eastern Kentucky got an inch of snow overnight, but scattered pockets of the state got 2 inches, according to the National Weather Service snowfall analysis. Now, it’s all about the cold.

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All across the country Monday, celebrations were held to pay tribute to America’s veterans. At Elizabethtown Nature Park, the city and American Legion Hardin Post 113 combined efforts to host the annual Veterans Day ceremony. “Veterans Day is a day for honoring our veterans – those men and women who have served and are serving our country,” American Legion Hardin Post 113 Com­man­der Joe Garrett told the dozens in attendance at the event.

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“You veterans are the pulse of America’s greatness.” These were just a few words of thanks spoken by Ret. Brig. Gen. and Boyle County Judge-Executive Howard Hunt when he welcomed veterans and their families to the 12th annual Heritage Hospice Veterans Appreciation Day Monday. “Veterans do all they can do to keep our country free,” Hunt said.

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Accused Alexandria shooting suspect Richard Fessler clenched his left hand at a jail podium as he answered questions via video conference Tuesday morning from Campbell County District Court Judge Cameron Blau. The 18-year-old said he was unemployed and had no family to pay for his legal defense on two murder charges and an attempted murder charge. Fessler asked for a public defender. Blau granted his request.

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A deputy with the Marshall County Sheriff's Office is recovered and back on patrol following an accident during which his car landed in a pond while en route to a call for help. Marshall County Sheriff Eddie McGuire said Deputy Blake Maness was "very, very sore" after his accident on Nov. 2, but luckily walked away unharmed.

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Western Kentucky University has nearly 1,300 fewer students this fall compared to the same time last year, enrollment numbers released Thursday show. The data from WKU’s Office of Institutional Research show total enrollment has fallen to 18,183, which is down from 19,461 students in fall 2018. Despite the decline, university leaders don’t seem stressed.

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The days and weeks following an election are traditionally a time when bad campaign blood is forgotten, when winners and losers alike extol the value of democracy, when we put down the partisan pitchforks and our newly elected leaders promise to serve everyone, not just those who voted for them. In the case of close elections, it can sometimes be appropriate to delay those necessary healing steps and take a closer look at the vote totals. In exceedingly rare cases, it can be appropriate to challenge an election’s results, when there is hard evidence of crime, vote fraud or illegal manipulation of the results. It is never acceptable to sow doubts about the democratic process for political or personal reasons.

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Election Day in Kentucky has come and gone, and it was quite an interesting election, to say the least. Watching the returns Tuesday evening, it appeared early that Republican Gov. Matt Bevin was going to win reelection by a slim margin. But later in the evening, as returns from other counties started coming in, the momentum flipped to Attorney General Andy Beshear.

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Democrats statewide are celebrating the apparent unseating of the Republican incumbent Gov. Matt Bevin in Tuesday’s election. If there were only one race to win — and it looks like that will be their only one — that is the upset they would pick. Bevin has not yet conceded. With Democrat Andy Beshear holding a lead of less than 5,200 votes, Bevin has requested a recanvass, scheduled for Thursday. Despite Bevin’s claims of “a number of significant irregularities” and suggesting Secretary of State Alison Grimes might be part of some conspiracy to steal the election, past history indicates that the recanvass is not likely to change the results. When Bevin won the 2015 Republican primary by 86 votes, a recanvass changed nothing. But despite the eventual final numbers, here are four (of many possible) takeaways from Tuesday’s results.

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For conspiracy theorists, this story has everything. A close election. A Republican governor loses narrowly to the Democratic Attorney General. Vague rumors of skullduggery that need to be investigated by ... the Attorney General. And overseeing all this voting is a Democratic secretary of state who is under investigation for problems in her office and whose father was recently convicted of campaign violations regarding one of his daughter’s campaigns. And yet. Gov. Matt Bevin needs to get a whole lot more specific about how he believes 5,000 votes may have been stolen from him, or he needs to bow gracefully out of the picture.

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A former Kentucky AAU girls’ basketball coach has been convicted of sodomy after he was accused of sexually assaulting one of his players in the back seat of his vehicle. A Hardin County jury found Corvell Conley, 43, not guilty Friday of third-degree rape, according to court records. A sodomy conviction is punishable by one to five years, and the jury recommended he serve four years in prison, according to The News-Enterprise.

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The former principal of the Clark Area Technology Center was indicted Thursday for multiple counts of possession and promoting sexually explicit images of juveniles, but fewer than in his initial arrest. Phillip Todd Wilson, 54, was arrested in August after an individual told the school resource officer they received about 15 images from Wilson through text messages and social media.

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Convicted killer Lonnie Martin is back on the trial docket in Clark County for allegedly killing his cousin in 1995. Martin, 46, of Stanton, pleaded guilty to manslaughter earlier this year for the 2013 death of Winchester resident Kyla Kline in Montgomery County. Thursday, a judge scheduled Martin’s Clark County trial to begin March 23, 2020, nearly seven years after his arrest and 25 years after the death of Joseph B. Martin.

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Last week, a prayer rally was held, which could be the start of a movement or it may backfire if people are not careful. The Pray Anyway rally that was held at East Ridge High School was in response to the prayer lockers being removed from schools. A few weeks ago, lockers were set up for prayer requests. But because it was not a student-led initiative, the Americans United for Separation of Church and State screamed “foul” and demanded separation between church and state, forcing the schools to do away with the prayer lockers. Consequently, students led the next initiative and asked for their own prayer lockers, which is OK. So now, the schools have student-led prayer lockers and all is good. Right? Not so fast.

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With the push of button, a local, state and federal multi-agency effort to keep Asian carp from moving farther up the Cumberland River was initiated Friday at Lake Barkley. U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and U.S. Rep. James Comer did the ceremonial honors in deploying a bio-acoustic fish fence on the downstream side of Barkley Lock, marking the first time a BAFF has been tested at a lock and dam on a large river. "Today we begin the latest cutting edge experiment which has the potential to make a real difference," McConnell told the assembled audience of approximately 85 people.

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As the vote on a potential Daviess County LGBTQ Fairness Ordinance looms, emotions are running high as certain sects of the community see the passing of an ordinance as a governmental step to guaranteeing basic human rights, while others view the potential passing as a slippery slope toward jeopardizing their religious rights. However, there is another perspective that is devoid of emotion or ideology -- economic impact.