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The idea to possibly develop a destination resort near the Red River Gorge has now produced a $1 million grant, a local advisory board, a contract for a master plan and a non-profit that wants everyone to hold on a minute. What’s more alarming, and what could also use the efforts of such concerned citizens is that not one of the four counties involved— Powell, Wolfe, Menifee and Lee — have any kind of planning or zoning rules. So, as several people have pointed out, the private land that’s a potential site, could be turned into a hog farm tomorrow.

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Perhaps as much as anything else in life, extreme nostalgia can be a double-edged sword, cutting sharply as the antithesis of progress. It is human nature to long for the past and look back fondly on our memories, although we forget they get idealized and the rough edges are sanded off by the passing of time.

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Right before former Gov. Matt Bevin left office in early December, he issued a number of controversial pardons that rightfully caused a lot of concern. As the list of pardons became public, we learned there were rapists and murderers among those who Bevin pardoned. Many people, including us, were stunned and angered that Bevin would pardon people who had been convicted by a jury of their peers and sentenced for their very serious crimes, only to be released under his pardons. In his capacity as governor, Bevin had the legal right to issue these pardons, but that doesn’t mean some in question were good ideas or make it any easier on the victims’ families.

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Gov. Andy Beshear, Mayor Linda Gorton and University of Kentucky President Eli Capilouto headed a march of several hundred people who faced flurries and frigid temperatures as they celebrated Martin Luther King Jr. throughout downtown Lexington. Dasha Garrison drove from Nicholasville with her daughter to attend the Lexington march for the first time.

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The snow flurries falling in the Louisville area Monday morning won't turn into much accumulation, but cold temperatures will stick around for another day or so. The National Weather Service said the region will see another night with temperatures in the teens, with light winds eventually pushing the cloud cover out during the overnight hours, leaving clear skies and the year's coldest temperatures.

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A woman charged with stabbing a man multiple times in an apparent unprovoked attack was indicted for assault Thursday. The Clark County grand jury returned a one-count indictment for first-degree assault against 40-year-old Michelle Hunter. The incident occurred at the Beacon of Hope Emergency Shelter on Bypass Road, where Hunter and the victim were residents.

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A Mouthcard woman was arrested Wednesday evening after, Kentucky State Police said, a visit to her Pike County residence led the responding trooper to believe that the children were placed in harm by conditions there. According to court documents, KSP Trooper T. Ritchie responded with social services to the Big Hackneys Creek residence of Melinda Adams, 34, where she was living with her two small children. Ritchie wrote that the youngest child still had pancake syrup in his hair and on his face from when the trooper had been at the residence two days before.

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A former school custodian pleaded guilty to sending images of a sexual nature to a minor in circuit court on Monday. David Darnell pleaded guilty to distribution of obscene matter to minors, which is a Class A misdemeanor; and tampering with physical evidence, a Class D felony. He is scheduled to appear in court on April 14, where he will be formally sentenced to two years. He had pleaded not guilty last year.

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Southeast Christian Church, Louisville's megachurch that was ranked the 7th largest church in America in 2016, announced Sunday it plans to open a new church in Bullitt County. The official location hasn't been decided, the church said in a statement, but it plans to launch meetings in a temporary space this spring. The campus will be pastored by Heath Barth, who's worked with the church for four years.

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"Oh freedom, oh freedom, oh freedom over me." Sitting in her west Louisville kitchen, Mattie Jones, the 87-year-old activist who is an unwavering force in the civil rights movement in Louisville, breaks out into the first line of the gospel song that carries the weight of generations of struggle and resilience. In the 1960s, Jones marched with Martin Luther King Jr. in Louisville against segregation in public schools and for open housing. And in more than six decades of activism since, Jones has organized countless demonstrations, public conversations and boycotts focused on women’s and workers' rights, environmental justice and police brutality.

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A car was crushed beneath the rear trailer axles of a loaded tractor-trailer in Henderson early Saturday, and firefighters say the driver is expected to make a full recovery. The driver was northbound on the Bi-State Vietnam Gold Star Twin Bridges in Henderson when the driver said the car’s engine died and the car lost electrical power, the Henderson Fire Department said in a Facebook post. “Shortly after, driver was apparently leaning across the front seats to retrieve a flashlight from the glove compartment when the car was struck by the tractor-trailer,” the fire department said. “The impact spun the car around 180° and dragged it approximately 100 yards against the concrete barrier on the bridge.”

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Keeneland has sold thousands of Thoroughbreds at its auctions but on Jan. 15, Hip 1021 crossed a historic boundary: It was the first one announced in the sales ring by a woman. Racing broadcaster Gabby Gaudet became the first female voice reading out the pedigrees to the potential buyers in 77 years. And people noticed.

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A Laurel County man and woman have been charged with abuse after sheriff’s deputies said they found a 2-year-old boy playing in the floor of a home in which dog feces was an inch deep in places. Two Laurel County sheriff’s deputies went to a home on Parks Subdivision in London Friday morning to do a welfare check, and when they went inside, the found the child playing in the floor with a bottle of bleach, the sheriff’s department said in a Facebook post. Dog feces was in chairs and on the floor throughout the house “in some places up to an inch deep,” according to the sheriff’s office.

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The Kentucky Future Farmers of America and Southern States agricultural co-operative stores have a special tractor to commemorate 50 years of women being allowed to participate in the organization. Local retired agriculture teacher Brenda Oldfield brought the tractor idea to Kentucky. The $65 tractor is sold exclusively through the Southern States stores where 100 percent of the proceeds have raised over $600,000 for the FFA.

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One of the most powerful moments during the 14th annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Community Memorial Celebration at First Corinthian Baptist Church came in the form of a simple gesture. As the capacity crowd of all colors joined voices to sing “We Shall Overcome,” one at a time they linked hands, creating a human chain across the church. “Love can change hearts, overcome evil. Love conquers hate,” the Rev. Dr. Nathan Moore, of the Historic First African Baptist Church in Lexington, preached from the pulpit only minutes before.

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A nursing home for military veterans in Bowling Green – which has been talked about for nearly a decade and has been on the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs list of priority projects for nearly five years – might soon take a big step forward. State Rep. Michael Meredith, R-Brownsville, is sponsoring legislation that would appropriate $2.5 million toward design and preconstruction of the proposed 90-bed facility. It is to be located in the Kentucky Transpark on land donated by the Inter-Modal Transportation Authority.

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God said on Thursday that he had been expelled from Whitefield Academy, a Christian school in Louisville, after administrators saw on social media that he had created the rainbow. God, who art in Heaven, said in an interview that his intent in creating the rainbow was to show his love for all people and wasn’t directed toward members of the LGBTQ community, but that he loves them too. School administrators said God’s expulsion came after “thousands of years of continuous violations of our code of conduct.”

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For one state representative from Eastern Kentucky, legalizing recreational marijuana is an economic issue, not a moral one. Democratic Gov. Andy Beshear has publicly supported the legalization of medical marijuana. In fact, his spokesperson told reporters last month that the state is ready for cannabis for medicinal purposes but cautioned that Kentucky must prove it can do so responsibly before taking other steps.

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For years, we have read and heard stories about senior citizens being badly mistreated in nursing homes around the nation. Our seniors deserve nothing less than good care and respect, which is why we need competent people – perhaps from outside the nursing home industry – to exercise oversight over these operations in our state. We had hoped that Gov. Andy Beshear would’ve appointed someone who would have inspired confidence in that role. But we got our hopes up for no reason, as he selected someone who has a history in this field and a bad track record in managing these facilities.

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According to a new study, a third of rural adults struggle to pay their medical and dental bills. The study, “Views of Rural U.S. Adults About Health and Economic Concerns,” was published by the JAMA Network Jan. 8, and included data from surveys of 1,300 adults in 2018 and 1,405 adults in 2019. Thirty-two percent of respondents reported having difficulty paying their medical bills, and 19 percent reported major problems.

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Working in the health care industry, Beth Burbridge knew to expect medical risks when she volunteered to donate a kidney to her neighbor's son in early 2019. What Burbridge didn't expect was the potential financial risks associated with her decision. Her company wasn't required to give her paid time off following the intensive procedure, hospital employees informed her. And she could be denied health or life insurance because she'd had the surgery. Other states have laws in place that alleviate the risks or offer protection to live organ donors, Burbridge learned. But in Kentucky, there are none.

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A woman charged with neglecting her three children has seen her case go to the grand jury. Timisha Anderson, 22, was arrested in December after her three children were found in “disturbingly unhygienic condition,” according to Winchester Police. Anderson was arrested and charged with one count of first-degree criminal abuse.

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Just over five months after it opened its doors, Sagebrush Steakhouse in Corbin was suddenly closed Thursday after Whitley County Sheriff Todd Shelley chained and padlocked the doors. Shelley said he and Chief Deputy Tim Baker carried out the order in the writ of possession filed in Whitley Circuit Court. Shelley emphasized that the order was not over unpaid taxes, but the result of a private dispute between Sagebrush and the property ownership.

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While criminal charges are still pending against Dr. David Coffey following a June 2018 raid at his Oneida office and clinics, federal officials have moved to seize $1.6 million and two vehicles confiscated from the accounts of the embattled doctor and his associates. In a filing in the United States District Court in London authorities are seeking the forfeiture of the cash and funds seized from various accounts, as well as two Mercedes Benz automobiles as they are allegedly related to “proceeds of and which facilitated drug trafficking.”

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On Thursday morning, a Senate committee gave first approval to a bill that would allow law enforcement officers to seek a search warrant for a blood test in all DUI investigations.Senate Bill 74 is sponsored by Sen. Whitney Westerfield, a Hopkinsville Republican and chairman of the Senate’s Judiciary Committee. Law enforcement officers can currently request a judge issue a search warrant for a blood test when a person is charged with DUI in a case where someone is killed or suffers a serious physical injury. Westerfield’s bill removes language about there needing to be a criminal charge and a death or serious physical injury.

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With classes starting a week earlier than usual, hopes are that more students will be able to participate in the annual observance of civil rights leader Marin Luther King Jr. at Murray State University. The keynote speaker for Monday’s breakfast will be U.S. Army veteran and Murray State alum Col. Charlie Sanders, who served 30 years in that service, including tours of duty in Iraq, Somalia and East Africa.

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and his 99 fellow senators took oaths Thursday afternoon to "do impartial justice" as the impeachment trial against President Donald Trump formally began. The oath's language marked a contrast from what McConnell said in December before the House voted to impeach Trump, charging the Republican president with abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. "I'm not an impartial juror," McConnell said in December after a reporter asked him what his message is to Americans who might have concerns about his ability to be impartial during an impeachment trial.

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The Republican-controlled state Senate passed a bill Thursday that could give Democratic Gov. Andy Beshear an extra year in office, if he is reelected. Sponsored by Sen. Chris McDaniel, R-Taylor Mill, the legislation would shift elections for Kentucky's governor and other constitutional offices to even-numbered years, coinciding with presidential elections. The bill would not take effect until 2028, pushing back the 2027 statewide elections by one year. Thus, the winners of the 2023 elections would have the one-time opportunity to serve five-year terms.

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Two-time Daytona 500 winner Michael Waltrip is hitting the gas pedal on the effort to legalize sports betting in Kentucky. The Kentucky native and NASCAR star has endorsed the effort in a radio ad by Sports Betting Now, a political group working to help build public support for sports betting legislation.

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Changes are coming to the controversial immigration bill that would ban “sanctuary” policies by police and most public agencies, a measure Senate Republicans labeled their top priority. Sen. Danny Carroll, R-Paducah, announced on the Senate floor Thursday that he will change parts of Senate Bill 1 and is “committed to keeping our door open for changes.”

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The top two leaders of Kentucky’s General Assembly say they’re tired of hearing lies. House Speaker David Osborne and Senate President Robert Stivers are considering a rule change that would require witnesses who testify during legislative committee meetings to be sworn in under oath, possibly subjecting them to perjury charges if they lie. “There have been several times, I won’t state specific instances, where some blatant misstatements of fact have been given in committee hearings,” Osborne, R-Prospect, said Friday.

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Boyle County High School students had a lesson about the dangers of distracted driving reinforced Thursday when the “Save A Life Tour” visited the school. Boyle County Attorney Chris Herron arranged for the free Kentucky Prosecutors’ Drive Safe Kentucky program to set up at the school. A video was shown that depicted several instances where texting and driving and drinking and driving caused the deaths of teens and families, and the physical maiming of a teenage girl whose life changed after her accident.

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A warm front followed closely behind by a cold front, are going to bring some big weather changes over the next few days. The high-pressure system that has been keeping things dry and sunny for us is moving out. This will usher in a warm front that will bring a wintry mix of rain and possibly snow late Friday night and into Saturday morning, according to forecasters at the National Weather Service in Wilmington, Ohio.

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A man accused in a deadly 2016 shooting is set to stand trial early next year in Logan County. Demetrius Roberson, 25, returned Thursday to Logan Circuit Court for a pretrial conference in a case in which he is charged with murder, attempted murder, first-degree robbery and nine counts of first-degree wanton endangerment. Roberson is charged in the death of Lexus Bell, 21, who was shot Aug. 21, 2016, in her home in Russellville.

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Based on his reception last week in Elizabeth­town, Dan Issel is idolized today in much the same way he was when playing for Adolph Rupp at the University of Kentucky a half century ago. His legend stands as tall as he does and local residents seem captivated. After speaking at the Hardin County Chamber of Commerce luncheon, he graciously posed for every picture and interacted with every well-wisher. It’s obvious he’s the right choice as an ambassador for basketball.

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Senate Bill 2, a proposed new voter ID law for Kentucky, has gotten a good amount of attention as this year’s legislative session has begun. But the actual impacts of requiring all voters to present photo ID in order to vote would be minimal at best. Voter fraud is essentially nonexistent, so there’s no problem to solve. But most voters already use a photo ID, anyway — or even better, they are known personally by the election officials running their polling places.

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Sanctuary cities have no place in our country. It’s illegal for a city to be a sanctuary, but several far-left states such as California, Oregon, Washington, Illinois, New York and others allow for them in violation of federal law. We have said many times and we will say it again: The states that allow these illegal sanctuary cities need to have all federal funding taken away from them until they comply with federal law.

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Following the fatal shootings of at least 20 horses last month in Eastern Kentucky, a resolution was introduced Wednesday in the state Senate calling for the creation of an “Abandoned Horse Task Force.” “People are out shooting them down like targets. We’ve got a problem,” Sen. Robin Webb told The Courier Journal. “But it’s hard to say how bad it is until we get an inventory of some kind.” Webb, of Grayson, and fellow Democratic Sen. Johnny Ray Turner, of Prestonsburg, are sponsoring the resolution, which notes that abandoned horses in the state often search for food and shelter and have caused automobile accidents by running onto roads.

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Federal health officials said late Wednesday a Union College student at an Eastern Kentucky hospital does not have an infectious disease. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention notified Barbourville Appalachian Regional Healthcare and the Kentucky Department of Public Health that all tests for any potential infectious disease are negative.

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A Magoffin County man documenting an ongoing go-kart project was injured when the brakes malfunctioned over the weekend. On Saturday, Jan. 11, rescue crews were called to Gose Branch where a neighbor had reportedly pulled Tim Coleman from the wreck, in which during a test run he lost control after the brakes malfunctioned, overturning the craft. He suffered third-degree burns from the wreck and at last report, was still in the hospital.

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The Kentucky Court of Appeals upheld a multi-million verdict last month against a Knott County coal company that officials report still owes funds to the City of Wayland. On Dec. 20, the Court of Appeals issued an opinion affirming a 2018 verdict given by Knott County Circuit Judge Kim C. Childers.

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It is this simple. Murray State fans still see Memphis Grizzlies star Ja Morant as one of their own. Though only on the Murray campus for two years, Morant left a giant footprint on the university’s storied men’s basketball program. Now a nightly attraction on most national sports news programs, Morant’s success with the NBA’s Grizzlies seems to have done nothing but endear him that much more to the fans that supported him when he helped the Racers win two conference titles and one NCAA Tournament game.

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Kentucky State Police arrested and charged a woman Tuesday with four counts of rape after officials say she confessed to having sex with a student on school grounds. Celena White, 36, told police she had sex with a 17-year-old student at Nicholas County School "more than once," according to an arrest citation. A KSP statement said the student was 16 during the "relatinship."

The seven Republican members of Kentucky's federal delegation occasionally have breakfast to trade notes, talk shop and get to know each other better. On more than one occasion, Rep. Thomas Massie has been teased by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell for having a contrarian reputation, a source familiar with these morning meals tell me. "Vote yes on anything today?" McConnell asked Massie, according to the source, who asked for anonymity in order to speak freely.

A fixture in Radcliff for more than 50 years, Jerry’s J-Boy Restaurant, is closed. The doors are locked on a business long open 24 hours a day. Besides a hand-lettered sign simply saying, “Closed” on the entrance, there’s no explanation to guests. As their business grew, the owners established the corporate name Jerrico. The company also created the Long John Silver’s and Fazoli’s fast-food chains.

A federal grant award topping $1 million to Western Kentucky University will help address a shortage of special education professionals seen regionally and across Kentucky. “The shortages are felt nationally, but definitely in an acute manner in our rural communities,” said WKU College of Education and Behavioral Sciences Dean Corinne Murphy, whose college is heading up the effort called Project PREP, or Preparing Rural Educators and Professionals for Students with High-Intensity Needs.

Even as it continues to hire temporary workers in preparation for adding a second shift next month, Bowling Green's General Motors Corvette Assembly Plant is transitioning nearly 60 hourly workers from temporary to full time. Detroit-based GM made the announcement Wednesday that more than 1,350 temporary workers at 14 of its U.S. facilities will shift to full-time positions before the end of March. Fifty-seven of those are at the Bowling Green plant, according to United Auto Workers Local 2164 President Jack Bowers.