These headlines are links to articles in other publications that may or may not require a subscription at that publication.

  • Updated

The Dant family is returning to Nelson County with plans to revitalize property near New Haven and build a $12 million distillery. During Bardstown's National Bourbon Day kickoff Friday, Log Still Distilling LLC announced it will construct a premium bourbon and rye whiskey operation on Dee Head Road between New Haven and New Hope. The campus will include a distillery, bottling operation, rick houses and a visitor center with gift shop and tasting room, and looks to create up to 20 full-time jobs. “It’s going to be a big renovation project,” owner J. W. “Wally” Dant said during Friday’s cermony at Spalding Hall Lawn, adding the project includes plans to use an existing bottling house on the property as well as an existing water tower.

  • Updated

James Burns as an "iconic tribute to our flag and country," are particularly poignant today -- Flag Day, the annual commemoration of "Old Glory" -- and worth a mention here. "I've been to the moon. I've been burned. But more often I'm honored," writes Burns, a retired University of Florida professor, of the stars and stripes. "I'm your American flag."

  • Updated

Those arrested and charged with crimes in Kentucky are innocent until proven guilty, but a new report finds where those individuals live might mean the difference between freedom or incarceration. The report, “Disparate Justice,’ was released Tuesday by the Berea-based Kentucky Center for Economic Policy. According to the report, new data from Kentucky’s Administrative Office of the Courts “shows widely-varying rates between counties in the use of cash bail and in the ability of those arrested to meet those monetary condition.”

  • Updated

As Father's Day approached, a group of dads got together in Louisville's Shawnee Park to play kickball and catch up. The men are part of a Kentucky-based program that teaches them how to better communicate with and care for their kids. James Bush Jr., 42, is an alumnus of the 4 Your Child program, which launched about four years ago and is led by University of Louisville professor Armon Perry. Bush brought a couple of his kids, including his 21-year-old son Tavion Mitchell, to the park. Perry, an associate professor at U of L's Kent School of Social Work, said the 4 Your Child project is meant to help fathers who want to take a more active role in their children's lives increase their personal capacity to do that.

  • Updated

On Thursday, the University of Kentucky announced the terms of John Calipari’s new contract. The announcement defined what was meant by an earlier announcement of an upcoming “lifetime contract” for the UK basketball coach. The contract calls for him to coach the Wildcats until he is 70 years old, or through the 2028-29 season. The new 10-year contract represents a five-year extension. UK will pay Calipari, who turned 60 on Feb. 10, a total compensation of $86 million in those 10 years.

  • Updated

A Corbin man was arrested Tuesday at the Corbin Walmart where his girlfriend reportedly fled after being held against her will for several days. Laurel County Sheriff’s deputies arrested Elmo Clinton Carroll, 35, on charges of second-degree unlawful imprisonment and fourth-degree assault.

  • Updated

Murder suspect Denzel Hill agreed to serve 20 years in prison Thursday for taking part in a shooting that killed two girls. Hill, 26, was the first of the four alleged shooters sentenced in the Nov. 7, 2017, double homicide at Washington Street Apartments. According to the agreement negotiated during a mediation process, Hill pleaded guilty to two counts of facilitation to commit murder and single counts of first-degree wanton endangerment and tampering with physical evidence. He would be sentenced to five years on each count, which would run consecutively.

  • Updated

Frank Bennett, CEO of the National Quilt Museum, had a promising statistic to share Wednesday with Paducah Rotarians. "In seven years, we have grown 50% in front-end visitors," he said. "Let's put that in perspective to Paducah. For every two people who traveled to Paducah to see the National Quilt Museum seven years ago, now three people do."

  • Updated

The Graves County Sheriff's Office is asking for the public's help as the case of a Graves County woman who disappeared 14 years ago is reopened. Sheriff Jon Hayden said in a news release Thursday the case involves the disappearance of Sandra Travis, 59, who was reported missing by her husband, Bobby Gene Travis, on Aug. 21, 2005.

  • Updated

Mayfield police are investigating after someone left five puppies in a church barbecue pit. At least one is now sick. A Mayfield First Presbyterian Church custodian discovered the puppies Monday morning. "He was near the Dumpster, taking out the morning trash, and heard the puppies crying over in the barbecue pit, right next to the Dumpster," said Dale Usher, an elder at the church.

  • Updated

In many ways, Thursday felt like 1971 all over again for Phillip and Carolyn Ferrell -- owners of the iconic Ferrell's Restaurant that has been a fixture in Madisonviile for nearly 90 years and has been closed since a September fire. It was roughly 48 years ago in 1971 when the Ferrells officially bought the restaurant from Phillip's aunt and uncle. This time around, Carolyn said it has taken a little longer to get the doors reopened due to the fire, but the excitement is very similar.

  • Updated

Nestled among dozens of tall trees along a narrow road in southern LaRue County, the remains of a home continued to burn late Thursday afternoon — a day after the body of an adult female was found inside the one-level structure. Kentucky State Police spokesman Scotty Sharp confirmed Thursday afternoon the body was found in the home by firefighters. A news release earlier in the day said a “deceased victim” was found inside.

  • Updated

The scores of four Hardin County Schools students will be invalidated after the Kentucky Department of Education said it believes several testing violations occurred within the school district during the 2017-18 year while it was administering the annual Kentucky Performance Rating for Educational Progress tests. In six letters sent to Super­intendent Teresa Morgan in May, Education Com­mis­sioner Wayne Lewis also recommended numerous staff members take training. All of the allegations were self-reported, Morgan said.

  • Updated

With above-average rains in the area, Kentuckiana might have a long mosquito season ahead. Through June 13, the Louisville area has had 29.26 inches of rain in 2019 — the 19th-greatest year-to-date rainfall since 1873, according to Joe Sullivan, a National Weather Service meteorologist. The normal annual rainfall for Louisville is 44.91 inches.

  • Updated

A painting of Muhammad Ali that is featured alongside other historic Kentucky icons on a Bardstown Road mural in Louisville has been vandalized. The words "racist," "antisemitic" and "homophobe" were painted in orange over Ali's portion of the "Kentucky Rushmore" mural that is on the side of the former WHY Louisville store near the intersection of Bardstown Road and Bonnycastle Avenue. The orange paint was eventually covered up with white paint. The mural also features paintings of Abraham Lincoln, Kentucky Fried Chicken founder Col. Harlan Sanders and Triple Crown-winning thoroughbred Secretariat.

  • Updated

A man wanted by state troopers is in custody Thursday night after police say he nearly hit them while attempting to flee in Louisville. Trooper Scotty Sharp, Kentucky State Police Post 4 spokesman, said 26-year-old Thomas Trummer Jr. was wanted on a warrant stemming from a Tuesday incident at a Louisville Kroger on Dixie Highway. Troopers found the Trummer, of Irvington, in the parking lot of Hotel Louisville at 2nd Street and Broadway just before 6 p.m. Thursday, Sharp said. According to online court records, Trummer has numerous active cases in Breckenridge and Hardin counties.

  • Updated

In a legal victory for Gov. Matt Bevin, the Kentucky Supreme Court unanimously upheld Thursday the Republican governor’s reorganization of several boards and committees that oversee public education in the state. Democratic Attorney General Andy Beshear, who is trying to unseat Bevin in November’s general election, sued over Bevin’s executive order in 2017 making the changes. The Supreme Court, in its 21-page ruling written by Chief Justice John D. Minton Jr., , said, “We find no statutory or constitutional infirmity with the governor’s use of the executive order to affect a temporary government reorganization on the facts before us, so we affirm the circuit court’s judgment.”

  • Updated

A county attorney in Eastern Kentucky has provided notice of his intent to sue a coal company once controlled by West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice to collect $670,000 in delinquent taxes. The notice from Floyd County Attorney Keith Bartley was dated Wednesday. The law requires a 45-day notice before filing a lawsuit in an effort to collect delinquent taxes. That’s the notice Bartley sent to Kentucky Fuel Corporation. The company has delinquent taxes on property and unmined coal reserves dating to 2013, according to the letter.

  • Updated

Police can be sued for damages when their car chases lead to the death or injury of third parties, the Kentucky Supreme Court ruled Thursday, overturning its own landmark 1952 decision that had granted blanket immunity to police after a crash. In the case at hand, the high court allowed the children of Luis Gonzalez to return to Fayette Circuit Court and sue Scott County Sheriff Tony Hampton and Deputy Sheriff Jeremy Johnson for damages related to his death. Gonzalez, 62, died in 2014 when a suspected drug dealer being chased by Johnson crashed head-on into his vehicle on Georgetown Road in Lexington.

  • Updated

With the explosion of popularity in bourbon in recent years, everybody wants a piece of that action. With so many tourists coming to Kentucky to sample our spirits, and their numbers growing yearly, there are lots of opportunities to cash in on bourbon tourism. We are encouraged to see the efforts made by the industry and local tourism officials to protect our stake in the bourbon world, and may this weekend grow to be one of Bardstown’s biggest.

  • Updated

One of the more popular and widely-shared news stories this week comes from Canada. After a 21-year-old driver flicked a cigarette butt out his Ford Mustang in Victoria, British Columbia, he was dealt a hefty fine. Victoria Chief Constable Del Manak wrote the man a $575 ticket for the act of “drop, release or mishandle of a burning substance,” which equals about $433 U.S. But did you know the simple act of tossing a cigarette out of your car in the U.S. can also come with a hefty fine?

  • Updated

A self-described moderate Kentucky Republican wants to help Democratic challenger Andy Beshear overthrow incumbent Matt Bevin in the 2019 governor's race. Former congressional candidate Chuck Eddy, of Lexington, said he is among the frustrated 48% of GOP voters who cast their ballots against the governor in May. "There's a number of us Republicans who are quite disappointed, which is a mild word, in how Matt Bevin has ruled, I mean governed," he said.

  • Updated

Rene Boucher and U.S. Sen. Rand Paul, linked inextricably through the fallout from the retired physician's assault on Paul as the lawmaker mowed his yard, no longer share a property line. Court records from the ongoing civil suit between the two indicate that Boucher sold his home in Bowling Green's Rivergreen subdivision last month. The proceeds from the sale, totaling $482,078.12, are to be placed ultimately in an account held by the Warren County Circuit Clerk's office while the civil suit is pending in the Kentucky Court of Appeals. Boucher has been ordered to place an additional $147,921.88 into the account by June 27.

  • Updated

After a week-long trial, a jury found a Perry County man guilty for a 2018 fatal shooting in Combs. Harold Hayes, 38, of Busy, was found guilty following a trial in Perry Circuit Court last week for his alleged involvement in the fatal shooting of Terry Stidham, 38, also of Busy, that occurred at Elm Shoal Branch in the Combs community last August.

  • Updated

A popular Mexican restaurant in Pike County was destroyed by fire early Tuesday. Shelby Valley Volunteer Fire Department Chief Dale Meadows told the News-Express that his department was dispatched to the Mi San Felipe Mexican restaurant at Caney between 5:30 a.m. and 6 a.m. Tuesday after a caller reported the business was on fire. Meadows said the fire was fully-involved when his department arrived shortly after receiving the call.

  • Updated

The child at the center of endangerment allegations against a former McNabb Elementary teacher and teacher's aide never caused a danger to himself or others, according to an attorney for the child's parents. Attorney Charles Walter released a statement Tuesday claiming no one attempted to intervene or de-escalate the situation during two incidents at Paducah's McNabb Elementary in February, when the student became agitated. The 9-year-old student is autistic and has multiple other impairments, Walter said.

  • Updated

Daviess County Animal Control is seeking foster homes and donations to help with a massive number of cats overflowing the facility. The shelter was already full before Animal Control Director Ashley Thompson received a call about a strong smell of cat urine coming from an apartment. Clark said animal control officers were told there were about 15 cats there. But when they served a search warrant on the apartment Wednesday, they found close to 50 cats inside.

  • Updated

Lindy Knight, a real estate agent, was notified Tuesday that the episode of HGTV’s “Lakefront Bargain Hunt Kentucky Lake” in which she appears will now be shown at 7 p.m. Central time Sunday, June 16. The original show date had been announced as June 23. The episode will feature a couple from Missouri as they seek to find their Kentucky Lake vacation home. This is the first time the Kentucky Lake region has been featured on HGTV Lakefront Bargain Hunt.

  • Updated

Scott County Deputy Jaime Morales knew immediately he was struck by friendly fire during a showdown Sept. 11 with a suspected bank robber, according to a report released this week by the Kentucky State Police. Morales’ interview was included in a voluminous report of more than 1,000 pages released by the KSP including interviews, diagrams, autopsy reports, court documents and photographs on confrontation between Scott County law enforcement and Edward J. Reynolds, a suspected serial bank robber at the Exit 127 northbound rest area late Sept. 11.

  • Updated

One person is dead in a house fire being investigated by Kentucky State Police and the state fire marshal’s office. The victim has not been identified. The body, which was discovered inside a LaRue County residence by firefighters, was taken to the State Medical Examiner’s Office in Louisville for an autopsy and positive identification. Detectives from KSP Post 4 responded Wednesday to the residential house fire in LaRue County following a call from the state fire marshal requesting assistance.

  • Updated

Aliah Humfleet, 9, who had been reported missing from her home near Florence on Wednesday, has been located and is safe, according to the Boone County Sheriff's Office. No other information regarding how she went missing or where she was located was provided.

  • Updated

The death this week of a 15-year-old in Edmonson County from a gunshot wound appears to be an accident, but the incident remains under investigation, according to the Edmonson County Sheriff's Office. The juvenile died Tuesday at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, and his body has undergone an autopsy. "Our investigation is ongoing, but at this time it appears as though it is simply a tragic accident," an email from the sheriff's office said.

  • Updated

The University of Louisville announced Wednesday night it is ending discussions to acquire KentuckyOne Health's Louisville assets, including Jewish Hospital, ending months of talks between the two sides. Difficulty finding a partner to help with the purchase was cited as a reason the talks were stopped. A university news release that said “U of L officials were not willing to put the university at financial risk by taking on the acquisition alone."

  • Updated

Franklin Circuit Judge Philip Shepherd, who ruled last month that an economic analysis of Gov. Matt Bevin's original pension reform plan is an open public record, indicated Wednesday he's inclined to order the controversial document be released. Shepherd described the disputed document as the "cold, hard analysis" of Bevin's sweeping 2017 proposal called "Keeping the Promise," which was done by actuaries for the Kentucky Retirement Systems. "It was funded entirely with taxpayer dollars and, in addition to that, with contributions of public employees who are participants in the retirement systems," Shepherd said during a hearing on the Bevin administration's request to delay release of the document until appeals are exhausted on the question of whether it's an open record.

  • Updated

the circumstances behind the dismissal of the office's chief of staff, Steve Knipper, in February. By late May, Adrienne Southworth also found herself out of work. "I needed answers to what was going on," Southworth told the Courier Journal in an interview Thursday. "When things don’t smell right, you just kind of start looking into them… My supervisor was fired. I knew that that wasn’t right and needed to figure out why." She wanted to know who Gov. Matt Bevin had designated as the person who could fire the lieutenant governor's staff.

  • Updated

A Lexington native and former billionaire CEO who was convicted in 2008 on charges of fraud is accused of hiding money in a Las Vegas casino while not paying the millions he owes in restitution, according to federal court records. Charles “Junior” Johnson is known for founding PurchasePro, a multimillion-dollar corporation that sold software that allowed companies to purchase products online from each other. The company formed in October of 1996 and filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in 2002. Johnson was found guilty of leading a 2001 plan to falsely inflate the revenue of PurchasePro.

  • Updated

After he was shot and mostly paralyzed by a police officer during a Sept. 11 confrontation that killed a fugitive, a Scott County sheriff’s deputy told Kentucky State Police investigators he had concerns about the training of his fellow officers. “I was more afraid of getting shot by one of the guys that was inexperienced than getting shot by actual bad guys,” said Scott County Deputy Jaime Morales. Morales was wounded while police were trying to capture fugitive Edward R. Reynolds, who was killed at a rest area off of Interstate 75.

  • Updated

The Kentucky Supreme Court on Thursday struck down a voter-approved constitutional amendment known as “Marsy’s Law” that would have established roughly a dozen rights for crime victims in state courts. The high court ruled that the actual language of the amendment — although lengthy and complex — should have been presented to voters on the statewide ballot last November, rather than the brief summary that voters saw. The Kentucky Constitution does not provide for a brief summary of proposed amendments, the court said. Marsy’s Law was approved by about 63 percent of the voters.

  • Updated

There is a form of abuse that occurs frequently and often silently: elder abuse. According to Kentucky’s Adult Protective Services Branch, “Most of us never see it because most victims are abused behind closed doors by their own family members. And, too often, people who do see it choose not to get involved because it’s ‘none of my business.’” According to Attorney General Andy Beshear, across the country, an estimated one in 10 elderly Americans are victims of abuse.

  • Updated

The Williamsburg pharmacist convicted in February on federal charges of unlawfully dispensing controlled substances and dispensing controlled substances to patients outside the scope of professional service was sentenced to six-and-a-half years in prison Tuesday. Kim Jones was sentenced to 6.5 years in prison following her conviction for unlawfully filling prescriptions and loaning prescriptions to customers at Kim’s Hometown Pharmacy. Kimberly Jones, 53, who owned and operated Kim’s Hometown Pharmacy appeared before U.S. District Court Judge Gregory VanTatenhove in London for formal sentencing on the seven counts on which a jury had found her guilty.

  • Updated

A local incentive package that will aid Pounds of Plastics, Inc. in locating to Owenton was finalized by the Owen County Fiscal Court Friday. While state incentives were approved last fall, Owen County Judge-Executive Casey Ellis said with any multi-million dollar deal, a “great amount of diligence is warranted.” A $4.1 million investment, the company is initially expected to bring a minimum of 54 full-time jobs to Owenton.

  • Updated

Calloway County Coroner Ricky Garland says that an early-morning fire today has claimed the life of a Murray woman. Garland identified the victim as Lanie Gray, 19, of Murray. He said she is the person firefighters removed from a burning unit within the Riviera Courts Mobile Home Community on Murray’s north side.

  • Updated

Owensboro Health Muhlenberg Community Hospital is one of 800 hospitals nationwide this fiscal year that will receive lower Medicare reimbursements as part of a federal pay-for-performance program that ties avoidable inpatient complications, such as post-operative blood clots, falls and infections, to federal payments. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services penalizes hospitals that rank in the bottom 25% for certain quality measures. Those facilities are docked 1% on inpatient payments as an incentive to improve.

  • Updated

Work to demolish and remove Lock and Dam 52 on the Ohio River near Brookport, Illinois, is set to begin as soon as river levels and conditions permit, according to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Louisville District. With the opening of the new Olmsted Locks and Dam last year, Locks and Dam 52 and 53, located at Brookport and Grand Chain, Illinois, were no longer necessary.

  • Updated

When their daughter, 2-month-old Tinsley, began to aspirate while feeding late last month, parents Sandra Taylor and Kenneth Burrus of Eddyville immediately called 911. And thanks to Eddyville Police Officer Shannon Oliver, the night ended in gratitude rather than tragedy.

  • Updated

The first of the four alleged shooters in a 2017 double homicide is expected to plead guilty Thursday. Denzel Hill, 26, is facing two counts of murder and single counts of wanton endangerment and tampering with physical evidence from the shooting outside the Washington Street Apartments. Two 16-year-old girls, Adreanna Castro and Kayla Holland, were killed in the parking lot.

  • Updated

A Lebanon man has been arrested after allegedly selling meth while also serving tacos and fried chicken at the Kentucky Fried Chicken/Taco Bell fast food restaurant in Lebanon. According to the arrest report, the Lebanon Police Department received information that Timothy C. Bailey, 26, was selling narcotics through KFC/Taco Bell. After speaking with the regional manager, Lebanon Police Officers were allowed to bring the K-9 (police dog) into the restaurant, specifically the manager’s office, to conduct a sniff search because that’s where Bailey allegedly kept the narcotics.

  • Updated

A Lawrenceburg man facing his second DUI charge allegedly threatened to beat up a district court judge and kill a deputy with the Anderson County Sheriff’s Office during his arrest last Friday night, according to a criminal citation on file in Anderson District Court. Franklin P. Uhlman, 60, of 1341 Aaron Barnett Road is also charged with resisting arrest, third-degree terroristic threatening, second-degree disorderly conduct and having an open container of alcohol in a vehicle, according to a report filed by deputy Jason Hendrix.

  • Updated

The four men involved in what police described as a home invasion that lead to the murder of a pregnant Lawrenceburg woman and death of her unborn child have been indicted by a grand jury for first-degree fetal homicide, a capital offense. All four were also indicted on a charge of complicity to commit murder, also a capital offense. The punishment for a capital offense ranges from death, life without parole, life with the possibility of parole after 25 years, or a sentence no less than 20 years, according to Kentucky statutes.

  • Updated

Kentuckians charged with crimes are treated so differently in every county when it comes to bail that they might as well live in different countries, a new study has found. The report, titled "Disparate Justice," says where people live in the state determines if they will stay in jail because they can’t make bail. The study was released Tuesday by the Berea-based Kentucky Center for Economic Policy, a nonprofit research group that found bail practices “wildly inconsistent” by county.