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This pandemic has brought many questions to my desk — questions that range from the seriousness of the virus, to conspiracies, schools, masks, and many other issues. The answers to those questions seem to change almost daily, so I want to give you some of my thoughts.

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In 2018 every day, 128 people died after overdosing on opioids. The total economic burden from the opioid epidemic, only with prescription opioids, was $78.5 billion per year.

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I don’t think any of us could have imagined what has transpired over the last week. The coronavirus has not only plagued the world as a public health pandemic, but it has very quickly devastated our economy and upended our normal business and daily routines.

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As Novel Coronavirus-19 (COVID-19) continues to spread in the commonwealth, I would like to thank everyone for doing their part with social distancing. Social distancing helps to flatten the curve of contagion so that medical facilities and staff are not overwhelmed and can appropriately han…

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This week is Sunshine Week, an initiative to promote the importance of open government and freedom of information. The annual week of awareness has been coordinated by the American Society of News Editors since 2005.

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Musings of an old-fashioned guy (emphasis on old). Time seems to pass more quickly when you reach the age where being a "senior citizen" is visibly noticeable.

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The final edition of the weekly Select TV Entertainment Magazine will publish in the Saturday, Feb 22 edition of The Messenger. This weekly tabloid publication contains entertainment features such as movie reviews, television show synopses, and daily prime-time listings for local cable and a…

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To the editor: In Mr. Adcock’s letter to the editor dated Jan.25, while writing about a secret letter Senator Ted Kennedy was said to have sent to the Soviets in 1983 to help U.S. Democrats defeat President Reagan in 1984, he referenced the website www.Truthorfiction.com as his factual verif…

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The General Assembly is currently in session, and that means every resident of the commonwealth needs to be paying attention to what is going on in Frankfort.

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At Mt. Carmel Cemetery in Paducah, there is a tombstone with my name on it. On the same marker is the name of my bride, our birth dates and the Sept. 14, 1968 date we became one in marriage.

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While legislators are meeting in Frankfort during this year’s General Assembly session, they will look for ways to improve Kentucky’s communities, grow the state’s workforce and provide an affordable way for students to attend and pay for college.

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Part of Mom’s kitchen canister set was a vessel appropriately labeled “Grease.” To the surprise and perhaps dismay of many, I survived a childhood wherein my innards were coated by the maligned substance derived from fried animal parts.

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December, most notably known as the month that ushers in the holiday season, is also National Drunk and Drugged Driving (3D) Prevention Month — serving as a reminder to us all to hand over the keys to a sober driver when overindulging.

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U.S. presidents, starting with George Washington, signed many proclamations thanking God for the blessings He had bestowed on this nation. But it was the 16th president who in 1863 set aside the last Thursday in November as an annual day of national thanksgiving. Following is Abraham Lincoln…

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It’s been nearly two weeks since we set our clocks back an hour for Daylight Saving Time, and many people are still likely recovering from the time change that comes twice a year.

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The days and weeks following an election are traditionally a time when bad campaign blood is forgotten, when winners and losers alike extol the value of democracy, when we put down the partisan pitchforks and our newly elected leaders promise to serve everyone, not just those who voted for them.

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Many eligible voters and potential voters are disenchanted with the election process because of the constant barrage of ugliness. It often takes the form of name calling, blatant exaggeration and sometimes just plain old misrepresentation.

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There is no need to adjust your television set when you start seeing an abundance of pink on the screen over the next three weeks. Everyone from cancer survivors to football players sport the color in October to raise awareness and funding for breast cancer research.

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Once upon a time, having a job at a newspaper meant working in one of the most imposing buildings in town, inhaling the acrid aroma of fresh ink and the dusty breath of cheap newsprint and feeling mini-earthquakes under our feet every time the presses started to roll. For those of us old eno…

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When you think of “Kentucky Proud” products, you probably think of things you buy at farmers markets and charming small-town shops. You probably don’t think about airplanes, Toyotas, Corvettes and medicine.

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In the 1980s, bullying involved never-ending name-calling, passing mean notes and the occasional de-pantsing of a boy in front of the girls. But back then the public humiliation pretty much ended with the school day, as there was no longer a receptive audience.

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Though the temperature may say otherwise and the leaves have yet to turn their autumn hues, it is technically fall in the Bluegrass State. It is also the official start of the flu season and state health officials are urging Kentuckians to get vaccinated.

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A new study from The Pew Research Center reveals who is more likely to pay for their news, and it’s no surprise: It’s those who are more engaged in their communities.

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If you’re reading this, you probably voted in the last election, and you’ll probably vote in the next one, too. Readers of community newspapers are significantly more likely to vote than non-readers, according to the newest annual readership survey from the National Newspaper Association.

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